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What is Briskwalking?

Briskwalking - And the Healthy Side of It

As the name suggests, Briskwalking is simply... walking briskly, walking faster, in fact consistently faster. People across the world are finding out that briskwalking is healthy and adds vigor and vitality to you life. Picking your pace does pick you up! As you explore the concept and put it to use in your daily life, you will find that it goes beyond the fun of walking--briskwalking is known to be a healthy habit.

Here are some of the known benefits of briskwalking which simply means walking at a brisk pace, brisker than you did before. The idea is to consciously pick up your walking pace till you develop the natural instinct or train your mind and body to be a briskwalker.

 1. University of Pittsburgh researchers recently crunched data from nearly 35,000 subjects 65 years or older and discovered that each increase in gait speed of 0.1 meters/second correlated with a 12 percent decrease in the risk of death. Among women 75 to 84, for example, 92 percent of the fastest walkers (traveling at 1.4 meters/second or faster) lived another ten years, while only 35 percent of the slowest walkers (shuffling at 0.4 meters/second or slower) survived until then.

 2. "The reason speed reflects vitality is that so many organs and systems are involved in how we move—the heart, the lungs, the muscles, the joints, the bones, the brain," says the 2011 study author Stephanie Studenski, MD. She speculates that gait speed may one day be a low-tech way for physicians to assess their patients: A slow pace could indicate a deeper problem and inspire patients to improve modifiable health factors, like blood pressure, diet, and fitness.

3. According to the Mayo Clinic physician staff, the following are only some of the direct benefits of a briskwalking regimen: lower LDL ('bad cholesterol), lower blood pressure, reduced incidence of type 2 diabetes, reduced fatigue. . . . .benefits go beyond these.

 4. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that more than 145 million adults now include walking as part of a physically active lifestyle. More than 6 in 10 people walk for transportation or for fun, relaxation, or exercise, or for activities such as walking the dog.

5. A 2009 British Medical Journal Study concluded that there is a strong coorelation between slow walking and increased incidence of heart attacks.

In fairness, there are others, including some doctors that say briskwalking can cause anxiety. However, the overwhelming research suggests that briskwalking, as part of a healthy regimen, can prolong not only life but quality of life.

 

Briskwalking Defined

We searched several sources that are dedicated to walking, jogging, hiking and running, and have narrowed down the definition as given in the following table.

MEN - BRISK WALKING LEVELS   WOMEN - BRISK WALKING LEVELS
ACTIVITY
LEVEL
MIN
SPEED
INCLINE
GRADE
  ACTIVITY
LEVEL
MIN
SPEED
INCLINE
GRADE
Walking
Level 1
3.5 miles per hour N/A   Walking
Level 1
2.30 miles per hour N/A
Walking
Level 2
4.0 miles per hour N/A   Walking
Level 2
3 miles per hour N/A
Walking
Level 3
4.5 miles per hour N/A   Walking
Level 3
3.5 miles per hour N/A
 
TREADMILL
Level 1
3.5 miles per hour 5%   TREADMILL
Level 1
2.30 miles per hour 0%
TREADMILL
Level 2
4.0 miles per hour 10%   TREADMILL
Level 2
3 miles per hour 5%
TREADMILL
Level 3
4.5 miles per hour 25%   TREADMILL
Level 3
3.5 miles per hour 10%

A couple of other requirements for you to achieve the above levels:

  1. If you have had a cardiac problem in the past, please consult with your physician on the advisability and the desired level of completion.
  2. You must not feel shortness of breath, breathlessness anytime during the completion of your routines as defined above.
  3. You must not feel any pain – if you do, please immediately discontinue the routine and consult a physician.
  4. Obviously if you suffer from joint pain, have knee problems or other conditions which make it tougher to walk briskly, you should consult your doctor and/or physiotherapist before attempting to increase your pace, either on or off the treadmill.

 

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